Winter Projects: Marigold Seed Saving

I’ve been growing my own marigolds from seed for many years now. They are quite easy to save seed from, once you know what you’re doing. Since fall is a chaotic season that leaves little time for non-time-sensitive projects, I tend to save my marigold seed-saving activities for the winter. Once a flower head driesContinue reading “Winter Projects: Marigold Seed Saving”

Waȟčázi sú / Sunflower seed

Waníyetu wóečhuŋ/ winter projects. This is another entry in my series of winter projects. Wahčázi sú kiŋ / the seeds of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus) are one of my favorite Indigenous North American traditional foods that many people don’t realize originate in the Americas. Then and now, they’re an important source of food and oil.Continue reading “Waȟčázi sú / Sunflower seed”

Wagméza kačháŋ / Winnowing corn

Waníyetu wóečhuŋ / winter projects. When working with traditional foods and plants, especially in a climate like Standing Rock’s where we have at least 5 months of winter, the work we do is highly seasonal. Some people would assume this means that there is nothing plant-related to do for 5 months out of the year.Continue reading “Wagméza kačháŋ / Winnowing corn”

2018 SBC Mobridge Standing Rock Seed Exchange

After the success of our first Standing Rock Seed Exchange in Fort Yates, ND, in Spring of 2018, we started hearing that people on the south side of the reservation wanted a seed exchange, too. So, the first Mobridge Seed Exchange was born. We met on a Saturday afternoon at the Sitting Bull College MobridgeContinue reading “2018 SBC Mobridge Standing Rock Seed Exchange”

Yom HaShoah: Hungarian Paprika

Today was Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. My grandparents’ friend Gabe is a Hungarian Jew who spent a portion of his childhood in a Nazi concentration camp. He was already an old man when I met him, and he spends his days growing rare heirloom tomatoes, some of which I have seen nowhere else. TodayContinue reading “Yom HaShoah: Hungarian Paprika”

Igmú Čheyáka / Catnip

I accidentally harvested catmint seeds the other day, thinking I was harvesting nettle seeds. This plant is called igmú čheyáka in Lakota, catmint in English, and Nepeta cataria. It is also (perhaps more commonly) known as catnip in engl. It’s indigenous to Eurasia, but has naturalized over here. It’s all over the place. I foundContinue reading “Igmú Čheyáka / Catnip”